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Health(s)care

Health(s)care! Am I being dramatic? Depends on your level of healthcare. Is healthcare scary? Depends on who you are.
Health(s)care

Death Rates for Various types of Cancer from 1930-2003: Source American Cancer Society

What happened?

Here's a summary:

The left and the right are arguing about healthcare proposals and legislation, while both parties are accepting campaign funds from the healthcare food and pharmaceutical industry lobby.

Is it helping? This argument has been going on for a long time and healthcare costs continue to rise while general health, disease and disorders continue to rise.

Why? Is it the insurance companies? Is it the labor unions? Is it the cost of medical education; medical equipment; medical advancement or research? Or, is their something else going on? Why is it getting so much more expensive?

All the things I have mentioned above are essentially the same as they were 40 years ago. Did something change? What?

Survey says... ‘Health’.

The problem isn't healthcare; the problem is ‘health’. There's just less of it.

It seems we no longer have a 'health' care system; we have a 'disease' care system. Not unlike a fireman that creates fires so he can put them out and be a hero; we have created dis-ease, so now we can cure it.

It may have been un-intentional (see the law of unintended consequences), but in our rush to make more for less, we made it worse.

It doesn't make sense, unless you’re on the profit end of the deal. That is, selling cheap food with unhealthy things in it to increase your profit margins, or promoting unhealthy amounts, or selling drugs to deal with the ailments caused by the unhealthy foods. So intentional or not, we need to be aware of what we did and start fixing it.

Why is it a health scare?

Because, if we don't start fixing this, the costs will continue to cut into our quality of care, and that is already a problem now.

Is our government watching our back, or, looking the other way; or worse, actively contributing to the problem? What is the problem? How did we go from health care to health scare?

It seems special interests have infiltrated our government through politicians whose campaigns are supported by industries that are profiting from the demise of our health. ALl this in the name of increased quality of life (or better living through science that profits them, not us). The rhetoric is so thick that it becomes increasingly difficult to see through the fog of opinions to get the facts and relevant knowledge.

America is consuming many food products that are contributing to the disease care system and we seem not to notice, probably because we are inundated with commercial advertisements telling us how healthy everything is.

Recent concerns about 'corn syrup', which seem justifiable, were met with an industry response of, 'Hey, how can it be unhealthy, it's from corn'. And of course to trick us, they changed the name on the label From 'corn syrup' to 'corn sugar'. This may trick some, but hopefully no all. A wolf in sheep's clothing is still a wolf.

The majority of food products now have ingredients in them that contribute to health disorders, including: obesity, cancer, diabetes, and a multitude of related health problems. Better living through chemistry, mold, additives, preservatives?

What are the main culprits (besides special interest influence in govermnet)? candidates seem to be high fructose corn syrup, hydrogenated oils, aspartame and regular overdoses of sugar.

The victim is the consumer. The FDA approves additives and processes that do not come naturally in food. Our bodies are used to eating 'real' food, but apparently reacts differently to food additives and chemicals as well as overdoses (too much of a good thing).

Since these modern miracles of better food through chemicals, mold and manipulation, the percentages of cancer, obesity, and general disorders have increased on a per capita basis.

(need research stats US)

Diabetes

According to the Center for Disease Control "From 1980 to 2005, the crude incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased 124% from 3.3 per 1000 to 7.4 per 1000. Similarly, the age-adjusted incidence increased 114%, suggesting that the majority of the change was not due to the aging of the population."

Diabetes Increase Rate per 1000 - CDC 1980-2005

From 1980 to 2010, the crude incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased 161% from 3.3 to 8.6 per 1,000 population. Similarly, the age–adjusted incidence increased 140% from 3.5 to 8.4 per 1,000 population, suggesting that the majority of the change was not due to the aging of the population. However, from 1980 to 2010, incidence did not increase at a constant rate. Both crude and age–adjusted incidence remained unchanged in the 1980s, and then increased in the 1990s through 2010. From 2008 through 2010, both crude and age–adjusted incidence has shown little change.

Source: Center for Disease Control & Prevention

Number (in Millions) of Persons with Diagnosed Diabetes, United States, 1980–2005

Diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. From 1980 through 2005, the number of Americans with diabetes increased from 5.6 million to 15.8 million. As the detailed tables show, people aged 65 years or older account for approximately 38% of the population with diabetes.

Diagnosed CDC 1980-2005

Diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. From 1980 through 2010, the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled (from 5.6 million to 20.9 million).

Source: Center for Disease Control & Prevention

Cancer

A midpoint assessment of the American Cancer Society's ambitious goal to cut cancer incidence by one-fourth by 2015 finds overall cancer incidence rates were eight percent lower in 2004 than they were in 1992. Despite those gains, the authors of the report say the rate of reduction over the first half of the challenge period was only about half the size necessary to reach the challenge goal, and that new understandings of preventable factors and new efforts are needed, particularly in the areas of tobacco control and obesity, to increase progress.

Cigarettes

The estimated average annual number of smoking-attributable deaths in the United States during 2000 through 2004 by specific causes, as follows:

  • Lung cancer: 128,900 deaths
  • Other cancers: 35,300 deaths
  • Ischemic Heart Disease: 126,000 deaths
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: 92,900 deaths
  • Stroke: 15,900 deaths
  • Other diagnoses: 44,000 deaths

Source: Center for Disease Control & Prevention

The cost of care is skyrocketing and the democrats and republicans are still (having their cake and eating it to at our expense) having their campaigns funded by associated food groups. I'm not talking about the meat or vegetable group; I'm talking about the 'food industry group'.

Ask yourselves, would you like to be healthy? Would you like to feel fit and live longer, happier lives? Would you like to spend more of your hard earned dollars on enjoying life rather than worrying about your next disorder, or doctor’s visit? Are you ready to admit that the political system is more interested it taking care of itself before you?

Question: What can I do right now?

Well, we can eat foods that are more natural and less convenient. I'm not knocking convenience, but rather saying if we are habitually eating convenience foods, it may be impacting our health.

What can I do for the future?

If the problem is special interests manipulating your food because they allow things in our food that harms our health because they are more interested in taking care of the food industry than people, the answer is simple.

Support centrist or independent candidates willing to fight for politics that make sense and break away from the Democratic and Republican Party campaign feeding tubes. It's just common sense.

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