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The below poll was sent to scientists by demanddebate.com a web site that not only questions the relevancy of thousands of scientists and holds that a handful of scientists using outdated narrow scoped data sets are right in their assertions that global warming is a myth of some sort or, whatever... but ready and willing to accept any money you are willing to depart with in order for them to further the cause of apparent misinformation they seem to be supporting. Caveat Emptor.

The Demand Debate Poll

The Ultimate Global Warming Challenge Poll

Editors note: The questions seem designed/scoped to illicit a response that would produce answers that can be used contrary to the scientific opinions those polled might have.

Some scientists may have answered earnestly thinking the poll is 'legitimate'. In this case legitimacy should be considered scoped in a manner to further understanding of the expanding realm of knowledge in the global climate arena. Rather it seems the author(s) of the poll have limited the scope so as to reduce the production of understanding that would add anything relevant to the argument at hand.


DemandDebate.com is surveying climate experts about climate change. It would be terrific if you could take a few moments to
participate. Please reply to this e-mail by answering the questions below. Simply place an "X" in the box that best represents your view.

Responses will remain confidential.


Question #1. Which best describes the reason(s) for climate change?

[ ] Human activity is the principal driver of climate change.
[ ] Human activity drives climate change, but natural variability is also important.
[ ] Natural variability drives climate change, but human activity is also important.
[ ] Natural variability is the principal driver of climate change.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Majority of climate scientists believe natural variability is important and natural variability drives climate change.

Question #2. Which best describes the role of manmade CO2 emissions in climate change?

[ ] Manmade CO2 emissions are the principal driver of climate change.
[ ] Manmade CO2 emissions drive climate change, but other natural and human-related factors are also important.
[ ] Other natural and/or human-related factors drive climate change, but manmade CO2 emissions are important.
[ ] Other natural and/or human-related factors are the principal drivers of climate change.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Majority of scientists believe climate change is driven by other natural and/or human-related factors, not CO2. Which can be spun to: the majority of scientists do not believe that CO2 is the main driver of climate change.

Question #3. Which best describes the impact on global climate of controlling manmade CO2 emissions?

[ ] Limiting manmade CO2 emissions would have a strong impact.
[ ] Limiting manmade CO2 emissions would have some impact.
[ ] Limiting manmade CO2 emissions would have no impact.
[ ] It would be impossible to discern the impact.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Scientists believe that limiting C02 emissions would not change much.

Question #4. Current mean global temperature is:

[ ] Unprecedentedly warm and getting warmer.
[ ] Within natural variability but moving to unprecedentedly warmer levels.
[ ] Within natural variability and stable.
[ ] Not a useful metric.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Current mean global temperature is within natural variability.

Question #5. The climatic impacts of a mean global global temperature that is 1-degree Celsius warmer than today are:

[ ] Undesirable.
[ ] Desirable.
[ ] Desirable for some and undesirable for others.
[ ] Too difficult to assess.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Scientists do not predict there will be any significant impact from an additional 1 degree Celsius warming.

Question #6. The ideal global climate is...


[ ] Warmer than the present.
[ ] Cooler than the present.
[ ] Occurring today.
[ ] There is no such thing as an "ideal" global climate.
[ ] No opinion.

Spin Potential: Scientists say there is no such thing as an ideal global climate.

Results of Poll Press - Nov. 8, 2007

First-Ever Survey of IPCC Scientists Undermines Alleged 'Consensus' on Global Warming; Poll Exposes Disagreement and Confusion Among United Nations Scientists

WASHINGTON, Nov. 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Is there really a "consensus" on global warming among the scientists participating in the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)? To find out, DemandDebate.com conducted the first-ever survey of the U.S. scientists who participated in the most recent IPCC report.


"Our results indicate that the notion of a meaningful scientific consensus on global warming is ludicrous," said Steve Milloy, DemandDebate.com's executive director.

During the month of October, DemandDebate.com polled each of the 345 U.S. scientists listed as contributing authors and reviewers of the IPCC's "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Basis" with a six-question survey on climate change. Fifty-four IPCC scientists completed the survey, including several of the most prominent global warming alarmists and several IPCC lead authors.

Less than 50% of the respondents said that an increase in global temperature of 1-degree Celsius is flatly undesirable. Half of the respondents said that such a temperature increase is either desirable, desirable for some but undesirable for others or too difficult to assess.


"Among survey respondents, then, there's no consensus on desirability of 1-degree Celsius of global warming -- twice the level of warming that occurred during the 20th century," observed Milloy.

When asked about the ideal climate, only 14% said that the ideal climate was cooler than the present climate. Sixty-one percent said that there is no such thing as an ideal climate.

"So if there's no agreement on what the target climate should be, what precisely is the point of taking action on global warming? What is the climatic goal at which we are aiming?," Milloy asked.

Another notable result is that an astounding 20% of those surveyed said that human activity is the principal driver of climate change.

"So was there no climate change before mankind?" Milloy asked. "And if there was natural climate change before man, why not now also?" he added.

Forty-four percent didn't think that the current global climate was unprecedentedly warm.

"The survey results indicate that when asked routine questions about the climatic role of manmade CO2, the IPCC scientists responded for the most part with the Pavlovian manmade-CO2-is-bad view seemingly demanded of them by the IPCC," Milloy noted. "But when you ask questions that are off the IPCC script, the supposed consensus seems to readily fall apart," concluded Milloy.

The survey report is on the web at

http://www.DemandDebate.com/ipcc_survey.pdf.

SOURCE DemandDebate.com

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